Launching the fourth version of our agency website

Published

October 7, 2019

Updated

October 17, 2019

When I launched version 3 of our website, I was a solo freelancer unsure of what the future of my business looked like. But, a little over a year later, Sarah had joined me and together we created "Serve." It was clear from the beginning that the website would need some work to accommodate our new identity as an agency. But, re-designing a website is an awful lot of work. So, we wanted to address a couple of other issues as well:

  • Ground our identity in a place. While the former site was unique, it didn't tell the story of our town. Chattanooga is important to us, and we wanted the site to reflect that.
  • Expand the case studies. On the original site, I used a very simple format for the studies. But, as an agency, we felt it was important to have a more thorough and custom approach.
  • Guide the user more explicitly. As a mild-mannered person, I always prefer a soft sell. But, now that there's two of us on the team, it was important to make our calls-to-action more prominent.
  • Explain our value. The old website addressed our philosophy and process in detail. But, I didn't follow my own advice to always start the conversation by sharing about the benefits to the user.
  • Highlight our web development service. Previously, web design and development were lumped together into one service. But, over the past few years, I've had a number of clients hire me just for development.
Two phone mockups with the old and new versions of the Serve website.
On the left, the original design. On the right, Serve 4.0

Headquartered in Chattanooga

Over the last year, I've worked with clients out of South Africa, Ireland, India, and all over the United States. We love working with folks outside of Chattanooga. Not only that, it's a financial necessity for our business. But, part of helping clients get to know you, part of telling your story is talking about where you work. Without that element, our agency felt disconnected and generic.

Of course, telling your story doesn't mean you have to use words. We decided to employ Sarah's illustrative skills to create a Chattanooga skyline for the home page header. Then, I used light animation to give the scene a parallax effect.

A desktop mockup displaying the Serve website. An illustration of the Chattanooga skyline is featured at the bottom of the mockup.

Fully formatted case studies

Originally, the case studies were a simple Rich Text Block. RTBs are components that led you add stylized text, images, and videos. But, they have a one-column layout that can feel a little simplistic. So, I designed a new case study template with a dedicated space for the creative brief, a 2-column layout for the approach section, and a bull-bleed section for project images.

A mobile phone mockup of the Serve case study template page.

Turning up the volume on CTAs

As we've frown from an individual to a two-person agency, it was important to be more direct with our website's users.

  • I made the navigation bar at the top fixed. As you scroll down a page, the navigation bar travels along with you. That means the "contact" button is always in view.
  • I added a jumbo-sized "Start your project" call-to-action in the footer, which shows up on every page.
  • At key moments on several pages, such as after the conclusion of a case study, I added another "Start your project" CTA.

How we benefit our clients

In our blog on website conversion, I made a case for connecting to the user by talking about how your service or product benefits them. On the home page and on each service page, I added a new section to do just that. I still get into process and philosophy downstream, but it was important to address our focus on our clients experience. After all, we called our agency "Serve." Below is the grid of benefits found on the home page.

Developing a web development page

I'm extremely proud of the value we offer as Webflow developers. We don't simply code websites. We put in an extraordinary effort to build them right. As a result, I've had multiple agencies seek us out specifically for development. So, I unbundled design and development so that I could speak about our development services with greater clarity and specificity.

Phone mockup displaying the Serve "Web Development" page.

Re-design your website with Serve

As you read about what motivated us to redesign our agency site, you may have connected with similar thoughts you've had about your own site. If that's the case, contact us. We'd be thrilled to partner with you to address those goals.